Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | September 12, 2013

September 12 [1859 and 1861]

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries for September 11-13, 1848.

Mary Lawrence, [Mon.] SEPTEMBER 12 [1859]: “We went through safely last night by soundings. I went to bed last night and slept soundly through the night. When Samuel is on deck, I have no fears. I am thoroughly glad, however, that we are through, and so is Samuel. Bering Strait is a very dangerous place, and I greatly wonder there are no more ships lost there than there are, although I have heard that a number of years since there were eleven lost in one season. The George nearby through the day. Foggy for the most part through the day.”

Eliza Williams, [Sat.] September 11th [1861]: “It has been a pleasant day, some fog around the land. We were in great danger last night and this morning of going [getting blown onto] ashore. Before night yesterday, we had a strong breeze and we were close in shore, when the wind of a sudden left us. It was deep water and the bold ragged rocks astern looked as if they were too near by a good deal. The tide was setting in and the ship had sternway on an did seemed we must go ashore, They tried to get her off and to the wind but it was of no use, they could do nothing with her and it came on night and dark. They let the small anchor; soon after they thought she was dragging and took up the anchor but it proved to be the tide acting on the ship. She was not dragging and they let it go again. There was not wind enough to get her underway. We were in hopes to have a breeze this morning but there was no wind. So they have been warping the ship out by sending a boat ahead with a kedge, or small anchor, and letting go. Then with a line haul the ship up to it and keep going so until we got as far out as we wanted to. There was a light breeze a little out of the bight beyond the point. I am thankful that we are out, the land is near us now but we can’t see and hear the breakers [shallow rocks in the midst of the area] quite as plain as we could this morning.”

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