Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | August 10, 2013

10th August [1859 and 1861]

Mary Brewster did not make a journal entry for this date in 1849.

 Mary Lawrence, [Wed.] AUGUST 10 [1859]: “Cold and blustering but quite clear. We are offshore quite a distance today and find a considerable ice, patches of it several miles in extent, also considerable loose floating ice. Sent the boats to the edge of the ice after dinner for walrus, which were in great numbers on the ice. They could not get in to the ice far enough to be successful. They took two which they brought to the ship. They are the worst-looking creatures that I ever saw, without exception. Saw three ships gamming, one of which was the Rebecca Sims where the captains had congregated. Very soon he came back, however, not meeting with a very cordial reception, for the captains wanted to come here where the lady was. They came back with him, and we passed a very pleasant evening. They were Captain Hawes of the Rebecca Sims, nothing this season; Captain Clark of the Bartholomew Gosnold, two whales; and Captain Thomas of the Eliza Adams, 1,600 barrels. He is the highest by far of anyone here except the Mary and Susan. She has 1,400. They took it off Thaddeus from the sixteenth May to the sixteenth June. Have seen no chance since. We made some coffee about ten o’clock and set out a small treat consisting of soda crackers, cheese, pie, and cake. Captain Thomas presented Minnie with a Japanese cricket, which he purchased at Hakodate. She was perfectly delighted with it. The captains left about twelve o’clock.”

 Eliza Williams, [Mon.] August 10th [1861]: “It has been a fine day. While we were cutting in this whale, the boy sung out that the boats were towing another and we soon had it alongside. It is a nice large one and the boats have left for they saw a plenty more when they struck this one. Mr. Morgan got this one. We are now going to stow down to make room for more. Then we will cut in this whale. The Othello’s boats have come for their whale and they came aboard to see us.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: