Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | February 26, 2013

February 26 [1848, 1859 and 1861]

Mary Brewster, SATURDAY [Feb.] 26th [1848]: “Strong winds from W by S to WSW and cloudy all day. Harry Cook a boatsteerer got badly hurt this forenoon, a hammer came off the handle and hit him on the head, so as to cut through his hat and enter his head. It is not thought to be dangerous but will take some time to heal up. Ends with light wind from WSW.”

Mary Lawrence, [Sat.] FEBRUARY 25 [1859]: “Captain Weeks and family passed the night with us, as they were smoking ship [a process to rid the ship of vermin; rats, etc.]. Mrs. Weeks, Lulie, and myself took the bed; made a bed up on the floor in the stateroom for Mary and Minnie. Captain Weeks took Minnie’s berth, and Samuel took the sofa.  After dinner Captain Weeks felt as if he wished to give his children one more run, so we went with them to tea on board the Scotland.”

Eliza Williams, [Thurs.] February 26th [1861]: “A Ship came in and anchored close by us about noon. She is the Cambria, Capt. Pease. The Captains have all been aboard of her to get the news. She is right from the Coast of California. Capt. Pease says that in Turtle Bay some of the Ships have done very well. Capt. Foster, of the Ontario, has done the best, having got 7 Whales — but Capt. Allen of the Onward, at Maria Island, has done the best of anyone, having taken 900 bbls [barrels; or about 28,350 gallons] of Oil since we last saw him in Turtle Bay, which was sometime in December. The Monmouth, that we saw in Turtle Bay, has been ashore and was damaged so much that she will be condemned. The Delaware is a total loss. We got some papers of Capt. Pease. One was as late as February 8th. Capt. Pease has his Wife and little Boy on board. He is going to send them home from Acapulco, on account of Mrs. Pease’s poor health. She will get home in about a week from the time she leaves there. They are going there direct and will soon be there. We will send some letters by her to our Friends. I am going on board to see Mrs. Pease this evening.”

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