Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | January 1, 2013

New Year’s Day [1848, 1859, and 1861]

Mary Brewster, SATURDAY [Jan.] 1st [1848]: “Finished boiling this afternoon and then all hands went to work and commenced throwing the tryworks overboard. At 9 this evening they are yet to work upon them. The whale made 55 bbls. Time in its rapid flight had brought us into the commencement of another year. It is profitable for us occasionally to take a retrospect of out past course and compare our present situation with what it might have been drawing there from stimulus for future action. What time more suitable than the close of the year when the events & sanguine plans of the future have too often proved futile. When the pathway of our past life appears to us only to shew us the long catalogue of broken promises and resolves which we have often made and as often forgot. Surely it is well and profitable to pasue and with firm unbending resolution commence this year praying God to keep us from all evil.   LAT. 34.20….”

Mary Lawrence, [Sat.] JANUARY 1 [1859]: “Oh, that I knew it was a happy new year to one and all of my friends at home. That it may be my fervent wish and prayer. May our Father have them all in his holy keeping. For the many mercies which were showered upon us during the past year, may we be truly thankful, and may we earnestly implore His guidance and blessing on this new year, which has just opened upon us so fresh and bright. If prosperity attend us, may we thank the Giver, and if adversity and trials shall be our portion, may we truly thank Him, remembering that ‘what seemeth evil is for our highest good.’ This morning we received a visit from Captain Chatfield of the Massachusetts….”

Eliza Williams, [Thur.] January 1st [1861]: “It has been a very fine day. Last night the Fabious got another whale. No other ship has one yet. This is the first day of the new year. Oh, how I wish I could be at home today and participate in the kind wishes of a happy new year, with all our friends.”

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