Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | July 7, 2012

July 6 [1847, 1858 and 1860]

Mary Brewster’s extensive entry for this date in 1847 will be posted here at a later date.

Mary Lawrence, [Tues.] JULY 6 [1858]: “Commenced breaking out and arranging matters preparatory to repairing the ship. Procured a carpenter from the Benjamin Tucker and carpenter and blacksmith from the James Maury, who is anchored near us. P.M. They have got her out of water as much as possible on the larboard bow, so that our position on board is not very comfortable. I have had invitations to go on board the other ships, but I think I can stay here very well. Captain Barber and Curry were on board all day. We have had fine pleasant weather through the day, but all outside the bay there is thick fog bank. I would hardly believe there could be such a difference. The James Maury has taken two whales this season.

Eliza Williams, [Fri.] July 6th [1850]: “It has been a warm, pleasant day with a nice little breeze most of the time — rather hazy around the land. Four boats went off at three o’clock this morning. About 10 o’clock a boatload of Russians came off to see us and to trade. They came from a little town 8 miles off, called Yausk [Tausk?]. The Priest came in the boat. He is the head man of the place. He came down in the Cabin and one with him that could talk a little English. He was very well dressed, but the rest poorly, mostly in skins. They were quite dirty. Their trade consisted in Bear Skins, some Deer Skin coats for Ladies, trimmed with fur and embroidered quite pretty, Ladies’ and Men’s Boots and Gloves made of Skin and embroidered. They brought off some nice milk and a few nice Salmon. They haven’t caught many yet as it is rather early for them. We traded a little with them, mostly for milk and fish. They wanted molasses, tea, soap, and other things.   Our boats returned without success. They saw one of two Whales. We shall leave here as soon as we have a fair wind.”

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