Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | September 15, 2014

September 15, 1849

Mary Brewster, SATURDAY [Sept.] 15th [1849]: “Light winds with tolerable weather the last week. A ship near but Mr. B. did not speak her knowing the ship — it is the Jeanette our old consort. It is pleasant to see a sail in this region but she sails so much better than we do that by tomorrow she will be out of sight. Wind continues fro SSW — ship going with a good full [sail?] — “

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries dated September 16 – 26th, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | September 9, 2014

9th September 1849

Mary Brewster, SUNDAY [Sept.] 9th [1899]: “A gale of wind for two days and it was rugged enough — All day calm and heavy swell, a light puff of wind occasionally, wind from SSW and unpleasant enough. Ship acts badly owing I suppose to all the oil being in the lower hole [hold] — Wind fair, it is roll roll — ahead, pitch pitch. Well, it can’t be helped.”

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | September 6, 2014

6th September 1849

Mary Brewster, THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 6th [1849]: “Up to this date we have had good weather; have got all ready for blows and bad seas. From the appearance without we shall have it very rugged soon — Weather thick and cold, wind ahead, ship heading W.”

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | September 2, 2014

September 1-2, 1849

Mary Brewster, SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 1st [1849]: “Light westerly airs with beautiful clear weather. I have been busy fixing for rugged weather. Mr. B. has been on board of the Two Brothers and passed the afternoon. Finished boiling. Stowed down the oil and the decks are quite cleared up. [The day] Ends with fine weather —   LAT. 63.48    LONG. 174.44.”

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Mary Brewster, SUNDAY [August] 2nd [1849]: “Quite winterish sleet and snow, real cool and misty weather. I begin to dread the passage — oh how glad I shall be if we ever get into good weather it will be a great treat. We have got a good wind and if we had a ship which would sail the passage would not be much. As it is it will take us some time longer — I’ll never go to sea again in a dull ship, never can get anywhere, at any rate I will try and keep my husband at home. Then there will be no fretting about passages being made.   LAT. 62.37   LONG. 174.44.”

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | August 31, 2014

30th-31st August 1849

Mary Brewster, THURSDAY [August] 30th [1849]: “Strong gales from West and rugged. Made East Cape at 3 AM. Had snow squalls with thick weather — most of the morning. At 12, we passed East Cape — with a light breeze — the land begins to be covered with snow and bears a winterish appearance. Spoke the Two Brothers, Capt. Jenney spent the afternoon on board. At 9, wind left us and it is a smooth as if there had been no wind for a week. Spoke the Cowper. Capt. Cole made us a visit of an hour or so; is in a great hurry to get to Lahaina having left his wife there –“

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Mary Brewster, FRIDAY [August] 31st [1849]: “Light winds from W to WSW and beautiful clear weather. Passed the bay where we first came to anchor when surrounded with ice. Saw the village of Ruguse, where friend Notocken lives, looking far pleasanter than when we passed it before, it being a low neck of land the snow soon melts and this time [was] entirely free [of ice] — At 9 this morning husband concluded to leave this region and we are now bound to Honolulu — I am truly glad to leave and when we passed East Cape I could not help saying ‘glad I leave and I hope I shall not see it again. The business on board is boiling [the whale blubber into oil or 'trying it out'], stowing down oil, and regulating ship — Saw 4 ships steering South.   LAT. 65’6   LONG. 170.”

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | August 29, 2014

Agust 29, 1849

Mary Brewster, WEDNESDAY AUGUST 29th [1849]: “At 12, wind moderated, got the ship fixed so she would lay better. Sea continued short and bad. 6 AM wind hauled and continued to blow from SW to W. Set the foresail at 12, set the mizzen topsail trying to get under the land. ’10 o’clock’ weather improving, sea not so bad.”

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | August 28, 2014

28th August 1849 – Storm at Sea!

Mary Brewster, TUESDAY [August] 23rd [1849]: “Wind shortly increased to a gale. I had not gone to bed having the toothache. At 10, put out the fire, too rough to boil [the whale blubber into oil]. At 12, wind got to the West blowing a hard gale with a very bad sea so I had to go below — had hardly got down when the cry of all hands on deck sounded — Soon I heard, all the boats gone, sir. I felt so wretched having had no sleep for some nights and such a toothache that this last cry did not frighten me — I felt as if I did not care — The boats were not all destroyed, lost one, davits, craft and all and stove the other two. Ship all broke out and in bad order for gale, lost one davit to the waist boat and had the second mate been a less active man should have lost that boat.  He made out to secure it. Split the foresail. Got the ship laying to, rolling heavily. Towards 6 AM wind moderated a little but sea increased which made the ship labor hard. Had snow squalls through the day with tremendous gusts of wind — Latter part wind subsided and sea got more regular. Ship on starboard tack, wind from West. This truly is a bad country and I shall be glad to have the weather better or leave it. I am getting nervous and dislike these gales, after such a time I feel sick and good for nothing. During the last one I have not suffered from fear; one can’t think of any greater trouble when they are half crazy with a toothache.”

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | August 27, 2014

August 27, 1849

Mary Brewster, MONDAY August 27th [1849]: “Good weather most of the day. Lots of whale but did not lower — got as much as can be taken care of. Decks all full, grease and try smoke — Stowing down oil, after hatch broken out, all full of business — Weather is getting cooler and we have had several snow squalls — Ends rugged wind from South blowing hard.”

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860.

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | August 26, 2014

25th August 1849

Mary Brewster, SATURDAY [August] 25 [1849]: “First part fine smooth weather. Plenty of whale and 4 ships in sight near. Got another whale and at 9 this eve they have got it in. I have been half sick the last week with the toothache; feel cross enough.”

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | August 24, 2014

August 23, 1849

Mary Brewster, THURSDAY August 23rd [1849]: “Early at 4 this morning noise of whaling caused me to get up and look out. Saw our boats were fast to [had successfully harpooned and killed] a whale less than an hour had it to the ship. Spoke the Marengo — Capt. [Zebedee] Devoll came on board and took dinner. Would have stopped longer but it began to blow, being rugged he left. Spoke the Two Brothers Capt. [Isaac H.] Jenney — ship laying to wind blowing rain a -pouring and thick weather.”

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Mary Lawrence’s husband’s ship, the Addison arrived at her homeport of New Bedford, MA at sunrise on June 14, 1860

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