Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 23, 2014

April 23, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make a journal entries from April 19-23, 1849

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Mary Lawrence, [Mon.] APRIL 23 [1860]: “Quite a strong breeze through the night, but more moderate in the morning. Occasional squalls of rain through the day. Towards night a strong breeze sprang up from the southwest, which soon amounted to a gale; but as it was fair, we took in some sail and ran before it. Made 160 miles the last twenty-four hours.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 22, 2014

22nd April 1860

Mary Brewster did not make a journal entries from April 19-23, 1849

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Mary Lawrence, [Sun.] APRIL 22 [1860]: “Pleasant the first part of the day. In the afternoon frequent squalls of wind, rain, and hail, accompanied by quite a severe thundershower, which lasted about two hours. Made 155 miles the last twenty-four hours.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 21, 2014

April 21, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make a journal entries from April 19-23, 1849

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Mary Lawrence, [Sat.] APRIL 21 [1860]: “Heavy squalls of wind and rain in the morning, accompanied by thunder and lightening. Mr. Baird prophesied a bad time, but fortunately the sun soon came out, dispersing the clouds, and the wind moderated, but the heavy sea continued through the day. Made 240 miles to the eastward the last forty-eight hours. Samuel. has been flat on his back all day. Could not rise in bed without a severe catch. I have been applying hot cloths today.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 20, 2014

20th April 1860

Mary Brewster did not make a journal entries from April 19-23, 1849

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Mary Lawrence, [Fri.] APRIL 20 [1860]: “Quite a strong head wind with a heavy head sea. Samuel has been laid up today with a catch in his side which he has felt coming on for some days.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 19, 2014

April 19, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make a journal entries from April 19-23, 1849

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Mary Lawrence, [Thurs.] APRIL 19 [1860]: “A hard rainstorm part of the night; fine weather in the morning with a strong breeze. About noon it moderated. Afternoon calm with a heavy sea. Made 145 miles to the northward the last forty-eight hours.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 18, 2014

18th April [1849 and 1860]

Mary Brewster, WEDNESDAY [April] 18 [1849]: “Day of days, we got a whale today, which they think will make 30 bbls — it took only a short time to cut in. Mr. Brewster says wait until we get a blubber room full before the try works are set a-going. Our officers are in high glee, they think they have done wonders and talk already as if the ship was full. I hope they will realize their most sanguine wishes –”

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Mary Lawrence, [Wed.] APRIL 18 [1860]: “A head wind from the northeast, which soon amounted to a moderate gale. Were under short sail or laying to the most of the day.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 17, 2014

April 17, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries from April 15-17, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence, [Tues.] APRIL 17 [1860]: “Light winds, but fine, pleasant weather. There is quite a perceivable change in the atmosphere within a week. Made 330 miles the last forty-eight hours.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 16, 2014

16th April 1860

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries from April 15-17, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence, [Mon.] APRIL 16 [1860]: “A nice breeze, but cloudy the most of the day. Quite a heavy sea, and we are all sufficiently exercised by rolling. No observations today.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 15, 2014

April 15, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries from April 15-17, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence, [Sun.] APRIL 15 [1860]: “A strong breeze with squalls through the night. The wind being aft, we went through the water at a very brisk rate. One ship in sight in the morning; passed her and was very soon out of sight. Made 235 miles the last twenty-four hours.”

 

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 14, 2014

14th April [1849 and 1860]

Mary Brewster, SATURDAY APRIL 14th [1849]: “Have had bad weather and a gale which lasted two days. Today it has been rather better weather. Saw six sail and if the ships are as plenty through the Sea there will not be many whales.   LAT. 36.04   LONG. 130.00.”

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Mary Lawrence, [Sat.] APRIL 14 [1860]: “Fine weather with occasionally a snow squall. Raised three ships bound as we are. One of them outsails us. We keep up with the second and beat the third. Made 180 miles in twenty-four hours.”

NOTE: By 1st April, Mary Lawrence, her husband, and daughter were headed towards Cape Horn (southern-most tip of South America), and as indicated by her journal entries, it often took days or even weeks to get to and around the Horn. Every day, as Mary noted in her journal, she endured often unpredictable and horrible weather. For Mary, rounding Cape Horn this voyage took close to two weeks, between April 1-12, 1860.

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