Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 20, 2014

20th April 1860

Mary Brewster did not make a journal entries from April 19-23, 1849

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Mary Lawrence, [Fri.] APRIL 20 [1860]: “Quite a strong head wind with a heavy head sea. Samuel has been laid up today with a catch in his side which he has felt coming on for some days.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 19, 2014

April 19, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make a journal entries from April 19-23, 1849

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Mary Lawrence, [Thurs.] APRIL 19 [1860]: “A hard rainstorm part of the night; fine weather in the morning with a strong breeze. About noon it moderated. Afternoon calm with a heavy sea. Made 145 miles to the northward the last forty-eight hours.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 18, 2014

18th April [1849 and 1860]

Mary Brewster, WEDNESDAY [April] 18 [1849]: “Day of days, we got a whale today, which they think will make 30 bbls — it took only a short time to cut in. Mr. Brewster says wait until we get a blubber room full before the try works are set a-going. Our officers are in high glee, they think they have done wonders and talk already as if the ship was full. I hope they will realize their most sanguine wishes –”

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Mary Lawrence, [Wed.] APRIL 18 [1860]: “A head wind from the northeast, which soon amounted to a moderate gale. Were under short sail or laying to the most of the day.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 17, 2014

April 17, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries from April 15-17, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence, [Tues.] APRIL 17 [1860]: “Light winds, but fine, pleasant weather. There is quite a perceivable change in the atmosphere within a week. Made 330 miles the last forty-eight hours.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 16, 2014

16th April 1860

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries from April 15-17, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence, [Mon.] APRIL 16 [1860]: “A nice breeze, but cloudy the most of the day. Quite a heavy sea, and we are all sufficiently exercised by rolling. No observations today.”

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 15, 2014

April 15, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries from April 15-17, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence, [Sun.] APRIL 15 [1860]: “A strong breeze with squalls through the night. The wind being aft, we went through the water at a very brisk rate. One ship in sight in the morning; passed her and was very soon out of sight. Made 235 miles the last twenty-four hours.”

 

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 14, 2014

14th April [1849 and 1860]

Mary Brewster, SATURDAY APRIL 14th [1849]: “Have had bad weather and a gale which lasted two days. Today it has been rather better weather. Saw six sail and if the ships are as plenty through the Sea there will not be many whales.   LAT. 36.04   LONG. 130.00.”

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Mary Lawrence, [Sat.] APRIL 14 [1860]: “Fine weather with occasionally a snow squall. Raised three ships bound as we are. One of them outsails us. We keep up with the second and beat the third. Made 180 miles in twenty-four hours.”

NOTE: By 1st April, Mary Lawrence, her husband, and daughter were headed towards Cape Horn (southern-most tip of South America), and as indicated by her journal entries, it often took days or even weeks to get to and around the Horn. Every day, as Mary noted in her journal, she endured often unpredictable and horrible weather. For Mary, rounding Cape Horn this voyage took close to two weeks, between April 1-12, 1860.

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 13, 2014

April 13, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries for April 11-13, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence, [Fri.] APRIL 13 [1860]: “Light winds through the night, but a nice breeze during the day. Raised two ships in the morning bound in an opposite direction from ourselves, and about noon raised on bound as we are. Made 135 miles in the last twenty-four hours.”

NOTE: By 1st April, Mary Lawrence, her husband, and daughter were headed towards Cape Horn (southern-most tip of South America), and as indicated by her journal entries, it often took days or even weeks to get to and around the Horn. Every day, as Mary noted in her journal, she endured often unpredictable and horrible weather. For Mary, rounding Cape Horn this voyage took close to two weeks, between April 1-12, 1860.

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 12, 2014

12th April 1860

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries for April 11-13, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence, [Thurs.] APRIL 12 [1860]: “A strong, delightful breeze sprang up last night, and we are flying through the water with all sail set as we have not done for the last two weeks. By observations today we have passed Cape Horn and are now in the broad Atlantic, whose waters wash the shores of our beloved home, which now seems very near. Saw one ship today under short sail trying to get to the southwest. That wind that is fair for us is ahead for him. Made 210 miles the last twenty-four hours.”

NOTE: By 1st April, Mary Lawrence, her husband, and daughter were headed towards Cape Horn (southern-most tip of South America), and as indicated by her journal entries, it often took days or even weeks to get to and around the Horn. Every day, as Mary noted in her journal, she endured often unpredictable and horrible weather. For Mary, rounding Cape Horn this voyage took close to two weeks, between April 1-12, 1860.

Posted by: Karlee A. Turner | April 11, 2014

April 11, 1860

Mary Brewster did not make any journal entries for April 11-13, 1849.

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Mary Lawrence, [Wed.] APRIL 11 [1860]: “Light winds again. We suppose ourselves to be today off the Diegos, a group of islands to the southwest of Cape Horn. Made 70 miles the last twenty-four hours.”

File:Diego Ramirez Islands.jpg

Pictured above: the Diego Ramirez Islands (Chile), located at:

(LAT) 56.29 South; (LONG) 68.44 West

NOTE: By 1st April, Mary Lawrence, her husband, and daughter were headed towards Cape Horn (southern-most tip of South America), and as indicated by her journal entries, it often took days or even weeks to get to and around the Horn. Every day, as Mary noted in her journal, she endured often unpredictable and horrible weather. For Mary, rounding Cape Horn this voyage took close to two weeks, between April 1-12, 1860.

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